Lost Time Injury (LTI), what does in mean?

Discussion in 'Acronyms' started by Neil Enslin, Aug 24, 2009.

  1. Neil Enslin

    Neil Enslin Moderator

    Lost Time Injury (LTI) A lost time injury (LTI) occurs when a person is injured in the execution of his/her duties and as a result of this injury is unable to perform his/her REGULAR DUTIES for one full shift or more on the day following day which the injury was incurred. Note: Regular duites are those duites associated with the job description of the injured

    Restricted Work (RWC) A restricted work case (RWC) is a work related injury which results in the injured being able to return to work but unable to carry out his/her regular duties.( light duty or light work)
  2. wayneh

    wayneh New Member

    Categorization of work

    Hi ... I'm trying to source any legislation or standards that lend a classification to the nature of work in respect of that which is light duty, medium duty and heavy duty.
    We are often faced with medical certificates from private physicians of employees who decree "light duty" for a specified period but are unable to determine if the existing normal duty complies with this requirement.
    What is the definition of light duty ?

    Cheers

    Wayne
  3. Brian

    Brian Member

    Morning All.

    In response to "What is the definition of light duty ?" the LTI inquiry

    I am not sure if there would be an absolute definition for the terms light duty or light work,because it would in my opinion be relative to: Five or more varying and varied points of criteria situations,circumstances,conditions etc. Which are always changing or different, this would make it very difficult to give the term a set or fixed definition.

    A.) The type of work the employee normally performed.
    b.) The nature of the job.
    c.) The nature of the injury.
    d.) The severity of the nature of the injury.
    e.) The health strength and or fitness level of the employee

    All of which could or would vary quite substantially.

    So as Neil has explained and defined the LTI so very well AS a lost time injury (LTI) occurs when a person is injured in the execution of his/her duties and as a result of this injury is unable to perform his/her REGULAR DUTIES for one full shift or more on the day following day which the injury was incurred.

    Note: Regular duties are those duties associated with the job description of the injured.

    So for example I would imagine and say for instance.

    If the employee was a brick layer,who fell off a "scaffolding or ladder, which we know occurs so regularly",and injured his back and needed some rest and recuperation (R&R) time
    but was able to sit quietly in a suitable chair at the office and lick stamps then that would be termed "light duty or light work".
    Perhaps a welder who sustained a minor eye injury to one of his eyes,which now has to be treated and covered with a swab for the healing process.He may not be able to weld so well but there is nothing stopping him assisting the other welders in holding equipment passing tools or the fitter and turner,perhaps working in the store assisting the store man, this then would be considered "light duty" as the temporary loss of sight in his one eye does not effect his physical strength or health he could be used to assist the riggers with moving of heavy machinery or the store man with heavy material handling etc.His injury does not encumber him as would a broken arm or leg in which case he would only be able to do "light work" such as stores or office admin etc.This is termed as a restricted work case (RWC), which is a work related injury which results in the injured being able to return to work but unable to carry out his/her regular duties.( light duty or light work) as so very well explained by Neil, in his rubric above.

    This means that the hours of the "Lost time injury" are not accumulated and as extensive as what they would have been if either of these employees did not return to work to lick stamps or assist the welder,riggers or store man.Then this would not count so heavily against the company in terms of man hours lost when it comes to their safety ratings or reports as required to be submitted to DOL or head office etc.

    Of course I think there are other "spin offs" as well, "and Neil ,please correct me if I am wrong" but in terms of COIDA and payments etc these are reduced or minimized for the employers when a worker returns to work as soon as possible after and injury and this may also have something to do with the reason why doctors\private physicians issue medical certificates from private physicians of employees who decree "light duty" for a specified period.

    But are unable to determine if the existing normal duty complies with this requirement.

    Wayne bear in mind the doctors or private physicians have to protect themselves against claims and litigation should they send the worker back to normal duties and he is injured or suffers further injury or pain, or the original injury is exacerbated (to make an already bad or problematic situation worse) especially where the employer now forces the worker to carry out his normal duties should he not be booked of for normal duty or light work as a RWC.

    :mad:Let us also be honest here. Some "employees" are also not so "forth coming,open or honest" when the doctor or physician ask them what type or kind of work they do,and these tend to,to coin a better phrase "SIT AAN" act as though they are dying or are just "Klein Seerig" when chatting to the doctor or physician about their injuries."I have known an electrician who wanted to go to the doctor because he sustained a paper cut. Seriously.:D

    I would now in conclusion say that is why they "are unable to determine if the existing normal duty complies with this requirement."and book them onto RWC or "light duty or light work".

    I hope I have been able to help you get your head around this one and see it in a different light.

    Cheers and regards.

    Brian

    Safe Mate
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 19, 2012
  4. wayneh

    wayneh New Member

    Categorization of Work

    Thanks Brian... Your points are noted and make sense.
    However, what I have been tasked to discover is if there is any legislated foundation to a categorization of work. For instance, in referencing the old MOSAct approach to heat stress in the workplace there was a matrix which identified the category of work to apply a period of rest vs work above certain heat stress levels. The OSH Act is silent on this and only takes the soft approach of ensuring adeqaute hydration means are available...

    We are about to embark on a Man-Job specification study to try and accurately identify both candidate matching for specific tasks as well as to establish the level of work classification.
    We are trying to realistically and fairly eliminate issues such as where an artisan suffers a minor cut to his thumb and then gets booked off by his private physician for 3 days as we are unable to define a "light duty" function and the subsequent cancellation of that doctors certificate by our contracted occupational health practitioner in favour of deployment in an administrative function with the applied band-aid !!!

    Looking at the Labour Act has not has also not shed light on either a reasonability or best practice guideline which results in significant abuse of LTI and WCC claims.
  5. Neil Enslin

    Neil Enslin Moderator

    Hi Wayneh,

    I suggest that you google search such information. I have come across it before but can't for the life of me found it now. However, to answer your question, there are no SA legislation or standards in this regard, but an international study done by an Occpational Hygienist using the WBGT factor, did identify the terms mention in your post.


    regards,
  6. Neil Enslin

    Neil Enslin Moderator

    See attached information I managed to found on the internet.

    Attached Files: